.

Click the image to Pin it!

Recently Updated!

I finally visited the Hobbit Inn in Orondo and wrote a post about it here. I also added in a fourth Washington State hobbit (ish) house — the Gnome House on Orcas Island — so the title is now a bit of a lie, but I’m keeping it as-is.

This article contains some affiliate links.  That means if you click on a link that is an affiliate link, and then make a subsequent purchase, I get a small commission which helps me support this blog (and justify it to the powers-that-be).

You had me at hobbit.”  I wish that this is what I had said, but Jerry Maguire was several years away. Shortly after I met my husband, I remarked on his large, hairy feet.  A Lord of the Rings nut who claimed to have first read the book at age seven (It seems to get earlier in some of his stories…I swear pretty soon he’ll have emerged from the womb having read all of Tolkien, including the Silmarillion!) he did a little hop and said, “I’m a big hobbit!” If you’re also a big hobbit and your version of travel lust includes a pining for the Shire, these three spots in Washington State will temporarily satisfy your hobbity cravings until you can get to Middle Earth or, at least, New Zealand.

The Brothers Greenhouses

Washington State Hobbit Houses Hobbit Holes PNW Hobbit House The Brothers Greenhouses in Port Orchard

Set out on an adventure to the back of this Port Orchard nursery to find a house so tiny it doesn’t even have a bed.  You can’t rent it and stay, but you can go inside and check out the little fireplace. Check out the rest of the nursery as well for their castles, fairy garden supplies, and an incredible mini shire fairy garden complete with tiny dwellings and a train set. Sadly, the mini shire is not for sale, but it inspired me to start trying to make my own.

The Forest House

Hobbit Houses in Washington State The Forest House in Orcas Island

I love this place so much, I wrote about it in TWO posts.

Near Eastsound, on Orcas Island, this magical (And I don’t tend to overuse words like “magical”) dwelling was formerly called the “Hobbit House” until the owner received notification that the word was trademarked.  Now called the Forest House, you can rent it on TripAdvisor. The book itself starts with “In a hole in the ground lived a hobbit.” While this house has features that would please any halfling, its location is among the trees and might satisfy some of the citizens of Rivendell. I think The Forest House might be a better name.

 

Underground Hygge / The Hobbit Inn, Orondo

 

Of the Washington State Hobbit Houses listed in this post, this is the winner for most-Hobbitish. Nestled in the hillsides of Orondo, WA, overlooking the Columbia River Gorge, it’s extremely private and has all the right features for living as a Hobbit…

…except that kitchen to make second breakfast or elevensies. We visited Underground Hygge — click here to read my post specifically about this Hobbit House.

For a closer look at the making of this enchanted hobbit dwelling, here’s a video:

The Gnome House

Find Your Inner Hobbit:

If you’d like to view the interactive map, click here or on the map to open it in a new browser tab.