0,00 USD

No products in the cart.

0,00 USD

No products in the cart.

Home » Where to View Salmon Spawning in Kitsap County This Autumn

Where to View Salmon Spawning in Kitsap County This Autumn

In 2020, the WSU Salmon Tours will be virtual -- but the salmon are still showing up. Here's more about it. You can go on your own for a socially-distant salmon-viewing event.

0
(0)

Every year Washington State University Kitsap County extension sponsors Kitsap Salmon Tours: a day of salmon viewing during spawning season. In 2020, however, for safety, they’re coming up with a calendar of virtual events. But the salmon are still here, and you can view them on your own around the various salmon-viewing sites in Kitsap. Just a note: the featured image here is from Julie on Flickr; a beautiful piece of art called “Spawning Salmon” under a Creative Commons 2.0 License.

Kitsap Salmon Viewing

During the fall in the Pacific Northwest, salmon return from the ocean up the rivers to spawn. Salmon are an anadromous species, which means they begin their life in freshwater, and then swim to saltwater, where they mature. Some salmon can stay in the ocean for up to seven years.

After that, the salmon will swim back to its home stream, lay eggs, and die. A useful resource for reading more about the salmon’s life cycle is here. In Autumn, you can see spawning salmon around the area at local rivers, creeks, and fish ladders.

In Kitsap County, Washington State University Kitsap Extension sponsors Kitsap Salmon Tours every fall, usually in early November. It’s a great event for kids who enjoy seeing the salmon swimming in the creeks. At the end of this post are the locations and date for this year’s salmon tour events…but you can go on other days as well to catch a glimpse of the fish.

Below is an infographic about what types of salmon you can find in the Pacific Northwest. During November, in Kitsap streams, you’re most likely to find chum and coho salmon spawning.

Kitsap Salmon Viewing Salmon Infographic

Some Considerations When Viewing the Salmon

  • Bringing polarized sunglasses will cut the glare and give you a better view of the fish.
  • Check pet restrictions for the area you’re visiting. You may need to leave Fido at home, but at least have him on a leash and keep him quiet.
  • Kids can get excited about the fish, but remember to keep them from disturbing/trying to touch the fish.
  • Remember to prepare for the possibility of wet weather around here in November. Even if it doesn’t look like it might rain, you might be surprised. And, even if not, you may encounter some boggy, slippery ground near streams.

Kitsap Salmon Viewing Places and Salmon Tours Times

As mentioned above, the WSU events are virtual this year. Previously, we had a list of all of the event sites and times on this post. Please visit the WSU Salmon tours webpage for the list of locations to view the salmon. We may list the virtual events on this post as they come up. Or, you can visit their calendar.

How useful, enjoyable, or helpful was this post?

Click to rate it!

Average rating 0 / 5. Vote count: 0

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.

We are sorry that this post was not useful for you!

Let us improve this post!

Tell us how we can improve this post?

You may also be interested in:

TWO “Immersive” Van Gogh Experiences are Coming to Puget Sound in 2021?

We have not one but TWO immersive Van Gogh exhibits coming to the Puget Sound area in Winter 2021. Which should you see?

Visiting the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival

After cancellation in 2020, the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival is back for 2021. Here's more information and when to see the tulips.

Foulweather Bluff

Foulweather Bluff is a protected nature refuge in Hansville, WA. It offers a short family-friendly hike to the beach and great birdwatching!
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
cheryl
cherylhttps://www.pnwbeyond.com
Cheryl lives in the small Norwegian-esque town of Poulsbo, WA with her spouse, one of two young adult daughters, an old mutt, and a Siamese cat. She was an Occupational Therapist, but she'd rather be writing -- right now, she's blogging on this and a couple of other sites and does the occasional small web design project for a client. She's trying to un-couch-potato herself again.
Get Updates by Email
Octopus circle image

Subscribe to our email list. By default, you'll get a weekly notification of new posts as well as very occasional newsletters and offers. But if you sign up here you can get event notifications and customize your preferences.

Share this
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x
Send this to a friend